303 W. Main Street, West Dundee, IL 60118
 | 847-428-7725
Call for a Free Consultation
Evening and Weekend Hours by Appointment
100 Illinois Street, Suite 200, St. Charles, IL 60174
 | 630-200-4882
By Appointment Only
Evening and Weekend Hours by Appointment
West Dundee, IL847-428-7725
St. Charles, IL630-200-4882
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Search
Serving Kane, McHenry, DuPage and Cook Counties
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in spousal support

Algonquin divorce attorney order modification

Once your divorce is finalized, it is important to recognize that the terms ordered or approved in court are legally binding and that there can be significant consequences if you fail to follow them. However, this does not necessarily mean that you are forever trapped by an agreement that puts you at a disadvantage, especially if your situation has changed significantly since your divorce. When circumstances call for it, you can pursue a legal modification to your divorce decree that considers your current state of affairs.

Reasons for a Divorce Decree Modification

The most common elements of a divorce decree that can be modified are spousal support, child support, and the allocation of parenting time and parental responsibilities. There are a number of possible situations in which a modification may be necessary or beneficial, including:

...

Algonquin divorce attorney asset division

Under any circumstances, divorce can put a financial strain on couples as they prepare to divide their assets. This aspect of the divorce process may be even more difficult during the COVID-19 pandemic, a time when property valuations can suffer due to the struggling economy and many people are concerned about job security. However, with the assistance of a skilled divorce attorney and the willingness to explore alternative solutions, you may be able to reach an agreement that protects both spouses from excessive financial hardship.

How Are Assets Divided in an Illinois Divorce?

Under Illinois law, most assets acquired by either spouse throughout the course of the marriage are usually considered marital property. During a divorce, marital property is to be distributed equitably, meaning that the division is usually not 50/50 but instead based on factors including the length of the marriage, the terms of any prenuptial or postnuptial agreement, child custody arrangements, and each spouse’s contributions to the acquisition of marital property. Each spouse’s health, financial situation, and earning potential are also considered, meaning that if one spouse has been impacted more severely by COVID-19, assets may be distributed accordingly.

...

Barrington divorce attorney

Mental illness can manifest itself in many different forms, including depression, anxiety, or schizophrenia. Some of these conditions are recognizable while others are harder to detect. Studies show that nearly half of American adults will experience a mental illness during their lifetime. In many cases, these conditions can cause the breakdown of a marriage. The emotional upheaval that a divorce causes can be challenging for anyone to go through, but when one spouse has mental health issues, legally ending a marriage can be even more intimidating. Although Illinois courts do not consider fault in a divorce, it will weigh several factors when determining certain marital issues such as child custody or dividing assets and property. The mental well-being of one spouse may impact the outcomes since a judge will consider what is in the best interest of the children.   

Practical Steps to Protect Yourself

The stress of a divorce can escalate the symptoms of mental illness. For example, a person who suffers from depression may become suicidal at the news that his or her spouse has filed for divorce. In other situations, a mentally ill person can become violent toward his or her spouse or children in response to the marriage dissolving. In certain cases, Illinois courts may terminate parental rights when a parent is mentally ill is unable to perform basic parental duties. 

...

Kane County divorce lawyersA divorce can impact all areas of a person’s life, from physically separating to breaking apart emotionally and financially. Once the decision to divorce has been made, a couple may think the hard part is over. However, the legal process of ending a marriage raises many new queries that need to be resolved. For example, how will property and assets be divided? If children are involved, who will be awarded the allocation of parental responsibilities and who will pay child support? What are the tax implications, especially when it comes time to file your taxes? With tax season upon us, it is important to be prepared by considering the tax consequences when you get divorced in order to protect your financial future.   

Tax Implications of Divorce

Even if you or your spouse has filed the divorce petition, if you are still married as of December 31 of that given year, you have the option to file jointly for that year’s tax return. Until a divorce decree has officially been issued, you are married in the eyes of the law. However, once your divorce is final, each party has the option to claim as Single or Head of Household. The right choice for your situation will depend on your specific circumstances, and it is advisable that you speak with a tax professional.

If you have children together, the parent with the majority of the parental responsibility typically files as head of household, and the tax exemption or credit for the children usually goes to this parent. In some scenarios, parents can split tax exemptions using IRS form 8332, which means the custodial parent allows the other parent to claim a child on his or her taxes. Parents can also claim a tax credit for each dependent who is under the age of 17. There are also other credits for contributions to education and childcare.

...

Kane County order modification attorneyThe end of a marriage can be devastating for many reasons. Life after divorce can seem daunting, especially the thought of starting over again. There are many things to resolve, such as how to divide marital property or assets, allocation of parental responsibilities, as well as child support or spousal support. Formerly known in Illinois as “alimony,” spousal support or maintenance may be awarded to one of the spouses in a divorce depending on the situation. However, although the amount set during the divorce proceedings may be appropriate at the time, a significant change in circumstances may call for an amendment to a spousal support order. 

How is Spousal Maintenance Distributed?

The reason for spousal maintenance in any divorce is to assist a financially dependent spouse who does not have the income or means to be self-supporting post-divorce. This is typically a stay-at-home parent who did not work outside the home while raising children. In some scenarios, a couple may agree to the amount and how often payments will be dispersed. If a couple cannot agree, they will have to go to court and a judge will determine how it should be distributed.

Depending on the terms of the divorce decree, spousal support payments can take various forms:

...

Algonquin divorce spousal support lawyerIn a divorce case, the court may award spousal maintenance (previously known in Illinois as alimony) to mitigate the economic impact of the separation for a lower-earning spouse. A spouse who has decided to forego a career in order to take care of their family or who earns a significantly lower income than their partner will likely be at a disadvantage following divorce as they build job skills to support themselves. Maintenance exists to help with that situation. 

Understanding Maintenance Terminology

If you are considering divorce or are in the process of obtaining a divorce from your spouse, there are a few terms relating to maintenance that are helpful to know:

  • Fixed-term maintenance - This type of maintenance is designated to end after a certain period of time, which the court will determine based on the length of the marriage. It is intended for marriages of less than 10 years. After the maintenance term ends, the receiving spouse is barred from pursuing further maintenance, and the spouse who was awarded the maintenance will have to be self-sustaining. This type of maintenance is intended to prevent repeated cases in court in which couples fight over the amount of maintenance and how long it will be paid.
  • Indefinite maintenance - This is maintenance that is awarded for an undetermined period of time and does not have a termination date set by the court. Indefinite maintenance continues until it is modified or terminated because of a change in circumstances for one or both individuals. It is most often awarded when a marriage has lasted longer than 20 years. 
  • Reviewable maintenance - In these cases, the court awards maintenance for a fixed period of time, but after that time, the court may review the couple’s circumstances to determine whether spousal support is still necessary. When reviewing the maintenance, the court can designate another fixed term maintenance as reviewable or non-renewable, or it can designate the maintenance as indefinite. 
  • Temporary maintenance - An individual may file a request for temporary maintenance while the divorce case is pending, as long as they have a legitimate reason for why maintenance should be awarded during that time. Temporary maintenance will usually end when the divorce is finalized. 

Contact a Knowledgeable Kane County Divorce Lawyer

If you need help understanding your rights to receive spousal support or your obligations to pay maintenance in your divorce case, our skilled Elgin spousal maintenance attorney can provide you with legal guidance and advocate for your best interests in court. We will provide the legal help you need throughout every step of the divorce process. Contact the Law Offices of Benedict Schwarz, II PC today at 847-428-7725 to schedule a free consultation. 

...
Martindale Hubbell Rating Super lawyers Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Comission Lawyers Association Program Illinois State Bar Association Kane County Bar Association DuPage Bar Association
Back to Top